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Karl Bohringer , PhD

Email: karlb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 221-5177

Dr. Bohringer's current research interests include micromanipulation and microassembly, as well as biomedical implants and bioMEMS for single-cell genomics and proteomics. There are two major research themes in his work: Controlling surfaces and interfacial forces at the micro and nano scale, including systems for controlled self-assembly of microcomponents, programmable surfaces whose local properties (for example, hydrophobicity) can be changed on demand, and MEMS actuator arrays and microrobots for moving tiny objects; Joining MEMS and biology by integrating new biomaterials into MEMS processes and devices, biomedical sensor implants, and microfluidic chips for handling and analyzing biological samples. Dr. Bohringer is also interested in discussing ideas for leveraging the unique capabilities of the Washington Nanofabrication Facility for research programs in the biomedical field.

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Hamid Bolouri , PhD

Email: hbolouri@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2748

Dr. Bolouri is interested in understanding how gene regulatory interactions control cellular state and identity, both in normal development and in diseases such as cancer. A particular focus of his lab is the development and use of integrative computational systems biology methods to map gene regulatory networks from whole genome data: currently they are working on identification of cis-regulatory sequence variations in childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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Karol Bomsztyk , MD

Email: karolb@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-7949

Dr. Bomstyzk areas of research interest include pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases; epigenetics of inflammation and infection; and epigenetics of HIV infection.

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Stephen Bowen , PhD

Email: srbowen@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-1128

Dr. Bowen's research focuses on quantitative molecular imaging of cancer and normal tissue for personalized radiation therapy. Specifically he is interested in machine learning of respiratory patterns for personalized motion management strategies during image acquisition, radiotherapy planning, and radiotherapy delivery; dose painting based on respiratory-gated FDG PET in NSCLC; and functional avoidance planning of both MAA and DTPA SPECT-defined lung regions in NSCLC and SC SPECT-defined liver regions in HCC.

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Phil Bradley , PhD

Email: pbradley@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7041

Dr. Bradley's research is focused on developing predictive models of molecular recognition using high-resolution structural modeling. His group is currently working to predict the specificity of protein-DNA and protein-peptide interactions. They develop and apply new algorithms for molecular modeling within the framework of the Rosetta software package, a set of tools for the prediction and design of protein structures and interactions.

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Robert Bradley , PhD

Email: rbradley@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5662

Dr. Bradley uses genomics, sequence analysis, and molecular genetics to study the mechanistic origins and phenotypic consequences of alternative splicing and other RNA processing. He wants to identify diseases where RNA processing plays important, and previously unrecognized, roles. His laboratory studies pre-neoplastic diseases and cancers such as brain, prostrate and breast cancer.

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Linda Breeden , PhD

Email: lbreeden@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4484

Dr. Breeden's research is focused on understanding how the commitment to the mitotic cell cycle is regulated in response to environmental and internal cues. The critical transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle are controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). In budding yeast, as in all higher eukaryotes, the decision to commit to another division cycle occurs in G1. Nine cyclins have been identified that bind and activate a single CDK, and three of these cyclins (Cln1,2 and 3) play critical roles in modulating the decision to enter the cell cycle. Her lab's long term goal has been to understand how the commitment to the mitotic cell cycle is regulated in response to environmental and internal cues. Most of this work has been done with rapidly growing cells and with cells subjected to DNA damage.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Elizabeth Buffalo , PhD

Email: ebuffalo@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-1432

Dr. Buffalo's general research focus is to contribute to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in learning and memory. She uses neurophysiological techniques to record information, simultaneously, from multiple electrodes in the hippocampus and surrounding cortex in awake, behaving monkeys. She investigates how changes in neuronal activity correlate with the monkey's ability to learn and remember, and she's particularly interested in the activity of neuronal networks that underlie learning and memory processes.

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Susan Bullman , PhD

Email: sbullman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-3449

The Bullman Lab focuses firstly on understanding the translational impact of the tumor microbiota in human cancers, and secondly on the delineation of specific mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of microbe-associated human cancers. They combine molecular microbiology, computational biology, biochemistry, and genetics to understand host-microbial interactions within the tumor microenvironment. Through such efforts, her lab seeks to make discoveries that have both a scientific and clinical impact in the emerging area of bacterial-associated malignancies. Bacterial agents that have a role in cancer initiation or progression provide a viable route for prevention and treatment of these cancers.

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Roger Bumgarner , PhD

Email: rogerb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 732-6137

Dr. Bumgarner's research is focused on the creation of tools to connect expression data to biological meaning and the application of these tools to understanding host-virus interactions and the host innate immune response.

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Cara Carty , PhD

Email: ccarty@whi.org

Phone: (206) 667-4142

Dr. Cara Carty specializes in public health; epidemiology; biostatistics; genetics; environmental health; and toxicology. Her research interests are in the Biostatistics and Biomathematics.

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Dennis Chao , PhD

Email: dchao@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1186

Dr. Chao's research interests are in computer and mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, including influenza, cholera, and dengue. His current projects include: containment of bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases threats; computer simulation of dengue epidemics; and in modeling the effects of mass cholera vaccination in Haiti and Africa.

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Chu Chen , PhD, NRCC, DABCC

Email: cchen@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6644

Dr. Chen's research interests include the identification of 1) diagnostic and prognostic markers to aid personalized management of head and neck cancer based on gene expression profiles, loss of heterozygosity, DNA copy number, and tissue microarray data.; and 2) determinants for the susceptibility to and survival from cancers of the head and neck, lung, endometrium, breast, prostate and testes through investigations into lifestyle factors, endogenous and environmental exposures, and genetic and epigenetic influences.

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Victor Chow , MD

Email: vchow@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7731

Dr. Chow conducts clinical research in lymphoma utilizing combination approaches with cellular-based therapies.

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James Dai , PhD

Email: jdai@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6364

James Dai’s Lab works in statistical genetics and genomics, design and analysis of randomized clinical trials, statistical methods for high-dimensional feature selection and prediction, gene-treatment interaction, mediation and instrumental variables regression. Methodologically, his lab is also interested in cancer genomics topics, for example integrative genomic analyses and intra-tumor heterogeneity. The overarching scientific interest is to discover and validate and genomic markers that drive cancer etiology, predict cancer prognosis and treatment efficacy.

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Cole DeForest , PhD

Email: ProfCole@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-5961

The DeForest Group seeks to integrate the governing principles of rational design with fundamental concepts from material science, synthetic chemistry, and stem cell biology to conceptualize, create, and exploit next-generation materials to address a variety of health-related problems. They are currently interested in the development of new classes of user-programmable hydrogels whose biochemical and biophysical properties can be tuned in time and space over a variety of scales. Their work relies heavily on the utilization of cytocompatible bioorthogonal chemistries, several of which can be initiated with light and thereby confined to specific sub-volumes of a sample. By recapitulating the dynamic nature of the native tissue through 4D control of the material properties, these synthetic environments are utilized to probe and better understand basic cell function as well as to engineer complex heterogeneous tissue.

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Jeff Delrow , PhD

Email: jdelrow@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2763

Dr. Delrow is the director of the bioinformatics resource at Fred Hutch. His primary role is to support researchers who need assistance with the analysis of genomics and proteomics data.

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Stephen DeRosa , MD

Email: sderosa@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1681

Dr. DeRosa's research focuses on the flow cytometric characterization of T cells induced by candidate T cell vaccines tested within the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN). HIs lab has developed assays that examine multiple T cell markers and functions simultaneously. An ultimate goal of his research is to identify the characteristic features of effective immune responses. Recent studies in his laboratory related to the failure of the vaccines tested in the Step trial have resulted in a broader examination of the potential impact of vaccinations on the immune system. Dr. DeRosa is examining T cells that are specific for the vaccine vector. His team is also developing methods to identify regulatory or suppressive T cells that can potentially be induced by vaccination.

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