91 Search Results

q=Mentoring

Search Again


Adam Drewnowski , PhD

Email: adamdrew@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-8016

Dr. Drewnowski's interests are in the characterization of dietary patterns, nutrition economics, spatial distribution of obesity rates; and in the development of new metrics to identify foods that are nutrient dense, affordable and sustainable. He currently examines social determinants of health, focusing on the mechanisms behind the observed social gradient in diet quality and body weight. He has developed new methods to estimate monetary costs of individual diets, opening the door to new research on diet quality in relation to diet cost; and his studies on healthy food access make use of GIS techniques and new methods on spatial epidemiology to determine who shops for food where, why, how far from home and for how much.

View Bio

Zhijun Duan , PhD

Email: zjduan@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3363

Dr. Duan's research is focused on the relationship between the form and function of human genomes during development and tumorigenesis. One of the striking features of the eukaryotic nucleus is that chromosomes adopt preferred conformations that vary across different tissues and developmental stages.

View Bio

Paul Edlefsen , PhD

Email: pedlefse@scharp.org

Phone: (206) 667-4086

Dr. Edlefsen's research interests include statistical and computational methods for bioinformatics applications. He is also interested in statistical modeling techniques for genome science analysis.

View Bio

Evan Eichler , PhD

Email: eee@gs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-9526

Dr. Eichler's long term research goal is to understand the evolution, pathology and mechanism(s) of recent gene duplication and DNA transposition within the human genome. His work involves the systematic discovery of these regions, the development of methods to assess their variation, the detection of signatures of rapid gene evolution and ultimately the correlation of this genetic variation with phenotypic differences within and between species.

View Bio

Michael Emerman , PhD

Email: memerman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5058

Dr. Emerman's Lab studies the molecular and evolutionary basis for the replication of HIV and related viruses, with an emphasis on the interaction of these viruses with their host cells. Our goal is to understand what determines resistance or vulnerability to current, past and potential viral diseases.

View Bio

Min Fang , MD, PhD

Email: fangm@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 288-1390

Dr. Fang's research focus is on the genomics and combinatorial genetics/epigenetics of human neoplasia. She is combining classical genetic approaches of mapping, karyotyping, and functional genetics with new genomic tools including microarray, comparative genome hybridization, and next-generation sequencing, to identify genetic and epigenetic aberrations in cancer that may serve as actionable biomarkers for treatment decision making for individual patients.

View Bio

Youyi Fong , PhD

Email: youyifong@gmail.com

Phone: (206) 667-1093

Dr. Fong's research interests are in statistical problems in biological assays, biological sequence analysis, and stochastic optimization.

View Bio

David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

View Bio

Gustavo Glusman , PhD

Email: gustavo.glusman@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1273

Dr. Glusman uses computational approaches to investigate genome structure and evolution; multi-gene families; prediction and discovery of genes and transcripts; genes not coding for proteins; visualization of complex data; and image analysis. His algorithms are contributing to the discovery of genes that are not easily identified using standard procedures, to the interpretation of large-scale transcriptomic and genomic data, and to the study of disease genetics.

View Bio

Raphael Gottardo , PhD

Email: raph@rglab.org

Phone: (206) 667-4076

Dr. Gottardo is the principal investigator in the Gottardo Lab and Fred Hutch. His research focuses on developing methods and tools for high throughput, high dimensional experiments with applications in vaccine research and immunology. His team also works on flow cytometry, peptide microarrays, next generation sequencing, Bayesian inference and computation, and statistical computing.

View Bio

Taran Gujral , PhD, Msc

Email: tgujral@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4149

Cells respond to external stimuli by activating nonlinear and highly interconnected networks of signaling proteins. Dr. Gujral's work focuses on understanding how these networks are wired in different cell types and how they influence response to growth factors or cytotoxic agents using both hypothesis driven and systems-based data-driven approaches. His lab combines approaches from molecular genetics with cell and systems biology to study a recently discovered Wnt5-Fzd2 signaling pathway in metastasis as well as cell-to-cell contact in regulating cell fate decisions.

View Bio

Patrick Heagerty , PhD, MS

Email: pheagert@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2685

Dr. Heagery's research interests are Regression techniques for dependent data including marginal models and random effects models for longitudinal data, methods for categorical time series, and hierarchical models for categorical spatial data, statistical computing, and applications in epidemiology and ecology.

View Bio

David Hockenbery , MD

Email: dhockenb@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4611

Dr. Hockenbery specializes in gastroenterology and the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis. Currently his group is focusing on: Investigation of the role of the c-myc transcription factor in bioenergetic regulation in cell growth and division, neoplastic transformation and apoptosis; Analysis of cell signaling and transcriptional responses to nutrient excess, employed in cells susceptible to neoplastic transformation.

View Bio

Eric Holland , MD, PhD

Email: eholland@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6117

Dr. Holland is a neurosurgeon and brain cancer researcher. His research goal is to address the molecular basis of brain tumors and develop new treatment approaches. His research focuses on developing mouse models of brain cancer that mimic how the disease behaves in patients. He has vast experience in conducting clinical trials in glioma patients and developing imaging strategies to follow mouse brain tumors as they develop a powerful system that is used to test promising new drugs.

View Bio

Sarah Holte , PhD

Email: sholte@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6975

Dr. Holte's general work is focused in mathematical and statistical modeling of time-varying biological processes. Her current interests lie in differential and difference equations to model the biology of HIV and the immune system.

View Bio

Dick Hoskins , PhD, MPH

Email: rhoskins@uw.edu

Phone: (907) 317-6821

Dr. Hokins' main interest in public health practice concerns the impact of climate change on wildlife and human health and how they interact. He is a participant in the Fulbright Specialist Program working as requested in developing countries. His specific research interests include applications of geographic information systems to public health practice, spatial statistics, and environmental hazard assessment for wildlife.

View Bio

Brian Iritani , DVM, PhD

Email: biritani@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 221-3932

Dr. Iritani's lab is studying the Myc oncogene family, Myc proteins are deregulated in many types of cancers including breast, brain, colon cancers, and most leukemias and lymphomas. He is interested in understanding how these proteins normally function in the development and proliferation of lymphocytes, and how these functions are altered during oncogenic activation. Utilizing cDNA microarray technology, his lab has identified sets of genes that are regulated by Myc in primary lymphocytes both before and after transformation.

View Bio

Eric Klavins , PhD

Email: klavins@ee.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-1743

Dr. Klavins is an associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He holds adjunct appointments in Computer Science and Engineering and in Bioengineering and is the Director for the UW Center for Synthetic Biology. Until approximately 2008, Klavins' research was primarily in computer science and control systems, focusing on stochastic processes, robotics and self-assembly. At about this time, he learned the basics of genetic engineering of the next few years switched entirely fields to synthetic biology and now runs an interdisplinary group of engineers, biologists, experimentalists, and theorists -- all focused on engineering life. His current projects include synthetic multicellular systems with engineered bacteria and yeast, modeling and design for synthetic multicellular systems, and laboratory automation.

View Bio

Charles Kooperberg , PhD

Email: clk@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7808

Dr. Kooperberg's main research area is nonparametric function estimation and the analysis of high dimensional data, in particular as applied to genomic and proteomics data.

View Bio

Christopher Li , MD, PhD

Email: cili@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7444

Dr. Li's research focuses on breast cancer and understanding factors related to its etiology and outcomes using a multidisciplinary approach. He studies the relationships between various hormonal exposures and risks of different types of breast cancer based on their morphology and expression of different tumor markers, risk factors for second primary breast cancer among breast cancer survivors, identifying markers that could be used for the early detection of different cancers using various proteomic platforms, examining disparities in cancer stage, treatment, and survival by race/ethnicity.

View Bio