184 Search Results

q=Collaboration

Search Again


Cole DeForest , PhD

Email: ProfCole@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-5961

The DeForest Group seeks to integrate the governing principles of rational design with fundamental concepts from material science, synthetic chemistry, and stem cell biology to conceptualize, create, and exploit next-generation materials to address a variety of health-related problems. They are currently interested in the development of new classes of user-programmable hydrogels whose biochemical and biophysical properties can be tuned in time and space over a variety of scales. Their work relies heavily on the utilization of cytocompatible bioorthogonal chemistries, several of which can be initiated with light and thereby confined to specific sub-volumes of a sample. By recapitulating the dynamic nature of the native tissue through 4D control of the material properties, these synthetic environments are utilized to probe and better understand basic cell function as well as to engineer complex heterogeneous tissue.

View Bio

Stephen DeRosa , MD

Email: sderosa@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1681

Dr. DeRosa's research focuses on the flow cytometric characterization of T cells induced by candidate T cell vaccines tested within the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN). HIs lab has developed assays that examine multiple T cell markers and functions simultaneously. An ultimate goal of his research is to identify the characteristic features of effective immune responses. Recent studies in his laboratory related to the failure of the vaccines tested in the Step trial have resulted in a broader examination of the potential impact of vaccinations on the immune system. Dr. DeRosa is examining T cells that are specific for the vaccine vector. His team is also developing methods to identify regulatory or suppressive T cells that can potentially be induced by vaccination.

View Bio

Deborah Donnell , PhD

Email: deborah@scharp.org

Phone: (206) 667-5661

Dr. Donnell is a Principal Staff Scientist in the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute (VIDI). She is the Principal Investigator of the HIV Prevention Trials Network Statistical and Data Management Center. The scientific faculty, drawing from the University of Washington Biostatistics department and the Population Sciences Program in VIDI, are responsible for the design and analysis of Phase III clinical trials to access the efficacy of biomedical and behavioral interventions to prevent the transmission of HIV

View Bio

Adam Drewnowski , PhD

Email: adamdrew@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-8016

Dr. Drewnowski's interests are in the characterization of dietary patterns, nutrition economics, spatial distribution of obesity rates; and in the development of new metrics to identify foods that are nutrient dense, affordable and sustainable. He currently examines social determinants of health, focusing on the mechanisms behind the observed social gradient in diet quality and body weight. He has developed new methods to estimate monetary costs of individual diets, opening the door to new research on diet quality in relation to diet cost; and his studies on healthy food access make use of GIS techniques and new methods on spatial epidemiology to determine who shops for food where, why, how far from home and for how much.

View Bio

Zhijun Duan , PhD

Email: zjduan@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3363

Dr. Duan's research is focused on the relationship between the form and function of human genomes during development and tumorigenesis. One of the striking features of the eukaryotic nucleus is that chromosomes adopt preferred conformations that vary across different tissues and developmental stages.

View Bio

Marianne Dubard-Gault , MD, MS

Email: mdg2019@uw.edu

Dr. Dubard-Gault is the medical director of the Cancer Genetics Program at SCCA. Her main research interest is to better understand how genetic information influences patients’ decision-making about health care and life choices. She is also interested in exploring ways to help people better access medical genetic information, talk about it with their families and use that knowledge to make decisions that fit their goals.

View Bio

Paul Edlefsen , PhD

Email: pedlefse@scharp.org

Phone: (206) 667-4086

Dr. Edlefsen's research interests include statistical and computational methods for bioinformatics applications. He is also interested in statistical modeling techniques for genome science analysis.

View Bio

Evan Eichler , PhD

Email: eee@gs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-9526

Dr. Eichler's long term research goal is to understand the evolution, pathology and mechanism(s) of recent gene duplication and DNA transposition within the human genome. His work involves the systematic discovery of these regions, the development of methods to assess their variation, the detection of signatures of rapid gene evolution and ultimately the correlation of this genetic variation with phenotypic differences within and between species.

View Bio

Robert Eisenman , PhD

Email: eisenman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4445

Dr. Eisenman studies how cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation are regulated through the actions of transcriptional networks, and how this regulation is subverted during tumor progression. Specifically, his laboratory research focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of an oncogenic transcription factor network (Myc/Max/Mxd) which is fundamental in all cancers.

View Bio

Michael Emerman , PhD

Email: memerman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5058

Dr. Emerman's Lab studies the molecular and evolutionary basis for the replication of HIV and related viruses, with an emphasis on the interaction of these viruses with their host cells. Our goal is to understand what determines resistance or vulnerability to current, past and potential viral diseases.

View Bio

Min Fang , MD, PhD

Email: fangm@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 288-1390

Dr. Fang's research focus is on the genomics and combinatorial genetics/epigenetics of human neoplasia. She is combining classical genetic approaches of mapping, karyotyping, and functional genetics with new genomic tools including microarray, comparative genome hybridization, and next-generation sequencing, to identify genetic and epigenetic aberrations in cancer that may serve as actionable biomarkers for treatment decision making for individual patients.

View Bio

Meghan Flanagan , MD, MPH

Email: mrf22@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 667-6736

Dr. Flanagan's research areas include lymph node evaluation, patient satisfaction and chemoprevention among women at high risk of developing breast cancer. She is also interested in exploring how to improve cancer-related outcomes and access to health services.

View Bio

Youyi Fong , PhD

Email: youyifong@gmail.com

Phone: (206) 667-1093

Dr. Fong's research interests are in statistical problems in biological assays, biological sequence analysis, and stochastic optimization.

View Bio

David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

View Bio

Denise Galloway , PhD

Email: dgallowa@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4500

Dr. Galloway's lab is interested in the mechanisms by which human papillomaviruses (HPVs) contribute to epithelial cancers. Most of their research has focused on the E6 and E7 oncogenes of the HPVs that have a high risk of progression to cervical cancers, such as HPV 16. In addition to mechanistic studies, the Galloway lab has had long-standing collaborations with epidemiologists and clinicians to understand the natural history of genital HPV infections, and the risk factors that cause only a small subset of women infected with high risk HPVs to progress to cancer. More recently, they have begun to study a different group of HPVs, known as the genus beta HPVs. These beta HPVs commonly infect skin, and may play a role in squamous cell skin cancers (SCSC). They have developed new serologic assays to detect antibodies to many HPVs and to human polyomaviruses.

View Bio

Jordan Gauthier , MD, MSc

Email: jgauthier@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2713

Much of Dr. Gauthier's research has been focused on improving outcomes for patients treated with BMT or CAR T-cell therapy. Through his work, he has identified factors that can help predict the success of CAR T-cell therapy for patients who have leukemia and lymphoma.

View Bio

Gustavo Glusman , PhD

Email: gustavo.glusman@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1273

Dr. Glusman uses computational approaches to investigate genome structure and evolution; multi-gene families; prediction and discovery of genes and transcripts; genes not coding for proteins; visualization of complex data; and image analysis. His algorithms are contributing to the discovery of genes that are not easily identified using standard procedures, to the interpretation of large-scale transcriptomic and genomic data, and to the study of disease genetics.

View Bio

Raphael Gottardo , PhD

Email: raph@rglab.org

Phone: (206) 667-4076

Dr. Gottardo is the principal investigator in the Gottardo Lab and Fred Hutch. His research focuses on developing methods and tools for high throughput, high dimensional experiments with applications in vaccine research and immunology. His team also works on flow cytometry, peptide microarrays, next generation sequencing, Bayesian inference and computation, and statistical computing.

View Bio

Taran Gujral , PhD, Msc

Email: tgujral@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4149

Cells respond to external stimuli by activating nonlinear and highly interconnected networks of signaling proteins. Dr. Gujral's work focuses on understanding how these networks are wired in different cell types and how they influence response to growth factors or cytotoxic agents using both hypothesis driven and systems-based data-driven approaches. His lab combines approaches from molecular genetics with cell and systems biology to study a recently discovered Wnt5-Fzd2 signaling pathway in metastasis as well as cell-to-cell contact in regulating cell fate decisions.

View Bio