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James (Jim) Bassingthwaighte , MD, PhD

Email: jbb2@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 685-2012

Dr. Bassingthwaighte's lab uses multiple radioactive tracers simultaneously to measure reactions of adenosine and its metabolites and to determine their rates of transport across membranes. Models describe the kinetics in a precise way, allowing us to understand the regulation. He is also the originator of the Human Physiome Project, a large-scale international program for developing databasing and biological systems modeling for understanding genomic and pharmaceutic effects on human physiology. His program is highly collaborative, involving co-investigators at a dozen U.S. universities, several in Europe, and in 14 departments at the University of Washington. Some of these are involved in the Physiome Project, in particular the Cardiome Project. The Cardiome Project, to define a functional heart in mathematical terms, extends from the biochemistry and the signaling, to the mechanics and energetics of the three-dimensional heart.

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Slobodan Beronja , PhD

Email: beronja@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7609

Dr. Beronja's group studies molecular and cellular mechanisms essential for tissue growth during development and the formation of tumors. His goal is to identifying genes and gene pathways that can be used as targets in cancer therapy.

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Mark Binder , PhD

Email: mdbinder@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2509

Dr. Binder's lab is presently investigating the dendritic mechanisms affecting the transfer of synaptic current to the soma of hypoglossal motoneurons recorded in rat brainstem slices. His team studies the voltage-dependance of the synaptic currents, what types of voltage-gated conductances on the dendrites affect the transfer of current to the soma and how concurrently-activated synaptic currents interact. They also use fluorescent imaging to determine the spatial distribution of the dendritic sodium, calcium, and mixed-cation channels. Binder's experimental projects are complemented by computer simulations using compartmental models of motoneurons with different types and distributions of dendritic conductances to help interpret the experimental data.

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Keith Eaton , MD, PhD

Email: kdeaton@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 288-7485

Dr. Eaton applies expert research knowledge to treating patients with lung cancer. His clinical expertise is in the areas of lung cancer, head and neck cancer, thyroid cancer, and cancer of unknown primary. His research interests include Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapies.

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Robert Eisenman , PhD

Email: eisenman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4445

Dr. Eisenman studies how cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation are regulated through the actions of transcriptional networks, and how this regulation is subverted during tumor progression. Specifically, his laboratory research focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of an oncogenic transcription factor network (Myc/Max/Mxd) which is fundamental in all cancers.

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Michael Emerman , PhD

Email: memerman@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5058

Dr. Emerman's Lab studies the molecular and evolutionary basis for the replication of HIV and related viruses, with an emphasis on the interaction of these viruses with their host cells. Our goal is to understand what determines resistance or vulnerability to current, past and potential viral diseases.

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David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

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David Hockenbery , MD

Email: dhockenb@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4611

Dr. Hockenbery specializes in gastroenterology and the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis. Currently his group is focusing on: Investigation of the role of the c-myc transcription factor in bioenergetic regulation in cell growth and division, neoplastic transformation and apoptosis; Analysis of cell signaling and transcriptional responses to nutrient excess, employed in cells susceptible to neoplastic transformation.

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Eric Holland , MD, PhD

Email: eholland@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6117

Dr. Holland is a neurosurgeon and brain cancer researcher. His research goal is to address the molecular basis of brain tumors and develop new treatment approaches. His research focuses on developing mouse models of brain cancer that mimic how the disease behaves in patients. He has vast experience in conducting clinical trials in glioma patients and developing imaging strategies to follow mouse brain tumors as they develop a powerful system that is used to test promising new drugs.

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Christopher Kemp , PhD

Email: cjkemp@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4252

Dr. Kemp is an expert on tumor suppressor genes and their roles in cancer progression and response to therapy. In addition to using mouse models to understand cancer biology, Dr. Kemp has pioneered the use of mouse models for identifying new biomarkers of cancer and for identifying new cancer drug targets using functional genomics. Dr. Kemp plays a leading role in several national research consortia including the NCI's Mouse Models of Human Cancer Consortia and the Cancer Target Discovery and Development Network. Dr. Kemp's research focuses on understanding how environmental exposure to carcinogens interacting with the genetic susceptibility of the host leads to cancer. He studies multistage carcinogenesis in the mouse in order to model the entire natural history of neoplastic development from the initiated cell to clonal evolution to a fully malignant tumor. His work focuses on the role of the p53 signaling pathway in various cancer models.

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Paul Lampe , PhD

Email: plampe@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4123

Dr. Lampe and his lab investigate the control of cell growth both at the cell biological/ mechanistic level and through cancer biomarker discovery. He studies the cell biology connecting gap junctions and intercellular communication (GJIC) with the control of cell growth, the cell cycle and, how the relationship is disrupted during carcinogenesis. To perform these studies he utilizes a variety of cell, molecular and biochemical techniques including GFP chimeras to monitor gap junctions in living cells.

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Christopher Li , MD, PhD

Email: cili@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7444

Dr. Li's research focuses on breast cancer and understanding factors related to its etiology and outcomes using a multidisciplinary approach. He studies the relationships between various hormonal exposures and risks of different types of breast cancer based on their morphology and expression of different tumor markers, risk factors for second primary breast cancer among breast cancer survivors, identifying markers that could be used for the early detection of different cancers using various proteomic platforms, examining disparities in cancer stage, treatment, and survival by race/ethnicity.

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Shuying (Sue) Li , PhD

Email: sli@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7066

Dr. Li is a senior scientist, whose research interests include development of genetic statistical methodologies, including phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic sequences, association of genetic markers with diseases, prediction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from other polymorphisms such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), host genetics association with human immunity, especially immune-related diseases such as HIV infection and progression.

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Yajuan Liu , PhD

Email: yajuan@uw.edu

Dr. Liu's research lab is currently focused on the following four projects: (1)Developing DNA sequence-based characterization of breakpoints of chromosome translocations/inversions in cancer using next generation sequencing. (2) Identifying new markers for Hepatitis C-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. (3) Correlating genetic alterations detected using genomic microarray and next generation sequencing with histology and clinical outcome in melanocytic neoplasms. (4) Use of genomic microarray analysis to rule in/out oncocytoma of the kidney in needle core biopsies. Dr. Liu's main goals are to identify cancer biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets and to develop molecular diagnostics using both conventional genetics methods and new genomic approaches to aid in precision diagnostics for personalized care.

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David MacPherson , PhD

Email: dmacpher@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6464

Dr. MacPherson studies two tumor types, small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and retinoblastoma. He conducts genomic analyses of human tumors to identify gene mutations that may contribute to tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. His goal is to understand the mechanisms through which cancer-mutated genes drive tumorigenesis, small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and retinoblastoma.

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Harmit Malik , PhD

Email: hsmalik@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5204

Dr. Malik is interested in a variety of problems that could all be classified under the genetics of evolutionary conflict. He studies rapidly evolving proteins as a hallmark of this kind of conflict, hoping to better understand the molecular nature of the conflict, as well as uncover previously unrecognized sources of conflict. His lab is currently working on several rapidly evolving projects including centromeres and heterochromatin, nuclear import and variant histones, and innate defense strategies against retroviruses

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Julie McElrath , MD, PhD

Email: jmcelrat@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6704

Dr. McElrath's lab investigates how components of T-cell immunity elicited early in HIV-1 infection contribute to control of HIV-1 disease, what the influence of antiretroviral therapy is, whether T-cell immune responses are involved in resistance to HIV-1 infection in high-risk persons, how antigen-specific mucosal T cells protect against HIV-1 exposure, and what elements of immunity correlate with protection against HIV-1 infection by vaccine.

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Chris Miller , PhD

Email: cpmiller@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3363

Dr. Miller works in Dr. Hootie Warren’s lab and is spearheading the development of a human microphysiological “tumor-on-a-chip” for accelerating investigation of the barriers to T cell immunotherapy in the solid tumor microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and the vascular endothelium. Efforts are focused on the most common type of kidney cancer, renal cell carcinoma. Dr. Miller has experience developing the human 3D vascularized renal-cell-carcinoma-on-a-chip that faithfully recapitulates angiogenic blood vessel sprouting in the presence of patient tumor spheroids but not normal-adjacent kidney cells. The tumor-on-a-chip approach is broadly applicable to a variety of solid tumors.

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Cecilia Moens , PhD

Email: cmoens@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5627

Dr. Moens lab studies the early development of the nervous system, using the transparent zebrafish embryo as a model system. Interests in her lab include the cellular mechanisms of neuroepithelial morphogenesis, the role of the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in directed neuron migration, and the mechanism of electrical synapse formation in the well-characterized neural circuit that drives the larval escape response. A new cancer project in the lab takes advantage of the transparency of the larval fish to visualize at high resolution the metastatic behaviors of human melanoma cells as they interact with macrophages and endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment.

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Peter Nelson , MD

Email: pnelson@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-3377

Dr. Nelson is an oncologist specializing in therapies for early- and late-stage prostate cancer, pathology, and genome sciences. The focus of current work in the Nelson lab involves efforts to uncover how prostate cancer forms. The goal is to create tools to diagnose the onset of prostate cancer, develop prognostic strategies, and help develop more effective therapies for treating this disease.

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