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Katherine Adams Guthrie , PhD

Email: kguthrie@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5595

Dr. Adams Guthrie specializes in biostatistics with current interests in design, conduct, and analysis of clinical trials; biostatistics; and women's health.

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Shreeram Akilesh , MD, PhD

Email: shreeram@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-6408

Dr. Akilesh is presently applying next generation genomic tools and analyses to understand the development, structure and function of the kidney and its component cells in health and disease.

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Adam Alessio , PhD

Email: aalessio@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2419

Dr. Alessio works with CT and PET cardiac perfusion imaging, protocol optimization for PET and CT, and tomographic image reconstruction problems with a particular interest in statistical issues regarding data analysis, organization, and reconstruction.

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Garnet Anderson , PhD

Email: garnet@whi.org

Phone: (206) 667-4699

Dr. Anderson's area of expertise are to design, analyze, and conduct randomized trials and Biostatistics. Her research interest is focused on Women's health; in particular in the area of prevention of chronic disease, health effects of menopausal hormone therapy, ovarian cancer, including biomarkers, screening, and risk.

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Erica Anderson-Nissen , PhD

Email: eanderse@fhcrc.org

Phone: +27 (0)21 202 2228

Dr. Andersen-Nissen is interested in studying the influence of early innate immune responses to HIV vaccines on subsequent adaptive immune responses elicited. In addition, she studies systems biology analyses of how immune responses are shaped.

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Cecilia Aragon , PhD

Email: aragon@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2567

Dr. Aragon's current research focuses on visual analytics, data science, collaborative creativity, emotion in text communication, text analytics, and the study of socio-technical systems including online text communication and social media. Her research group both develops software for and produces qualitative studies relating to the socio-technical aspects of data science with a focus on very large text data sets. Some of her other projects include the use of computer gaming for collaborative science and engineering learning and discovery, and topics related to usability and sustainability.

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Wyeth Bair , PhD

Email: wyeth0@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 221-8241

Dr. Bair's group integrates computational modeling and electrophysiology to study neural coding and cortical circuitry in the visual system. A primary focus of his work is the visual motion pathway. He is currently developing several integrated online resources to carry out his goals. These include the Neural Signal Archive, which contains neuronal data for public access; the Working Models site, which provides access to network models of the visual system; and the data system, which is a set of utilities for storing and analyzing spike trains.

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Geoffrey Baird , MD, PhD

Email: gbaird@uw.edu

Phone: (206)744-9787

Dr. Baird's clinical interests include laboratory test utilization, molecular diagnostics, proteomics and immunohistochemistry. His group has developed a new proteomic technology for biomarker discovery in a range of diseases such as malignancies, cardiovascular disorders, and inflammatory conditions. One application of their technology is to discover protein expression changes associated with non-small cell lung cancer that have implications for diagnosis and treatment.

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Aasthaa Bansal , PhD

Email: abansal@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 427-5448

Dr. Bansal's research interests include the statistical evaluation of biomarkers and medical tests for disease prognosis and treatment selection. In addition to her background developing statistical methodology, she was involved in collaborative research at the Center for Biomedical Statistics from 2009 to 2013. While there, Bansal worked with academic investigators on the statistical analysis of studies in colon cancer screening, esophageal cancer treatment, institutional profiling, chronic illness management and juvenile arthritis.

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William Barlow , PhD

Email: wbarlow@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 839-1761

Dr. Barlow's expertise is in the area of Biostatistics: it includes designing, conducting, and analyzing breast cancer clinical trials. His other interests include breast cancer screening, other clinical prognostic and predictive markers, trial design, and efficient sampling methods for biomarker evaluation.

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Ruanne Barnabas , MBChB, DPhil

Email: rbarnaba@uw.edu

Phone: 206 520-3813

Dr. Barnabas is an Infectious Disease Physician-Scientist at the University of Washington and affiliate at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Her research focuses on HIV treatment and prevention, specifically on interventions that reduce HIV viral load and, consequently, disease progression and transmission. Her projects use both empiric data and mathematical models to better understand HIV clinical progression and transmission, and estimate the potential impact of HIV interventions at population level. The ultimate aim of her work is to estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV treatment and prevention interventions to inform clinical trial design.

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Anirban Basu , PhD, MS

Email: basua@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-2986

Dr. Basu is a health economist whose research focuses on evaluations of treatments that can be personalized to generate value in health care settings. His research spans the areas of quality of life; with substantive focus on cancer and mental health. He has also worked on the theoretical and empirical foundations in cost-effectiveness analyses and value of information analyses in the context of prostate cancer and schizophrenia.

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Norman Beauchamp , MD, MHS

Email: nbeauch@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-0871

Beauchamp's area of clinical expertise is neuroradiology and neurointerventional radiology. His research interests include: using imaging to non-invasively obtain the correct diagnosis and to assess effectiveness of treatment, using imaging to identify risk predictors of stroke and dementia; developing and validating diagnostic tools for the early diagnosis of acute stroke; applying interventions to minimize injury secondary to stroke. He also has a patent for the computer-aided processing and analysis for stroke in neuroimages.

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Mark Binder , PhD

Email: mdbinder@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2509

Dr. Binder's lab is presently investigating the dendritic mechanisms affecting the transfer of synaptic current to the soma of hypoglossal motoneurons recorded in rat brainstem slices. His team studies the voltage-dependance of the synaptic currents, what types of voltage-gated conductances on the dendrites affect the transfer of current to the soma and how concurrently-activated synaptic currents interact. They also use fluorescent imaging to determine the spatial distribution of the dendritic sodium, calcium, and mixed-cation channels. Binder's experimental projects are complemented by computer simulations using compartmental models of motoneurons with different types and distributions of dendritic conductances to help interpret the experimental data.

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Karl Bohringer , PhD

Email: karlb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 221-5177

Dr. Bohringer's current research interests include micromanipulation and microassembly, as well as biomedical implants and bioMEMS for single-cell genomics and proteomics. There are two major research themes in his work: Controlling surfaces and interfacial forces at the micro and nano scale, including systems for controlled self-assembly of microcomponents, programmable surfaces whose local properties (for example, hydrophobicity) can be changed on demand, and MEMS actuator arrays and microrobots for moving tiny objects; Joining MEMS and biology by integrating new biomaterials into MEMS processes and devices, biomedical sensor implants, and microfluidic chips for handling and analyzing biological samples. Dr. Bohringer is also interested in discussing ideas for leveraging the unique capabilities of the Washington Nanofabrication Facility for research programs in the biomedical field.

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Stephen Bowen , PhD

Email: srbowen@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-1128

Dr. Bowen's research focuses on quantitative molecular imaging of cancer and normal tissue for personalized radiation therapy. Specifically he is interested in machine learning of respiratory patterns for personalized motion management strategies during image acquisition, radiotherapy planning, and radiotherapy delivery; dose painting based on respiratory-gated FDG PET in NSCLC; and functional avoidance planning of both MAA and DTPA SPECT-defined lung regions in NSCLC and SC SPECT-defined liver regions in HCC.

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Robert Bradley , PhD

Email: rbradley@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5662

Dr. Bradley uses genomics, sequence analysis, and molecular genetics to study the mechanistic origins and phenotypic consequences of alternative splicing and other RNA processing. He wants to identify diseases where RNA processing plays important, and previously unrecognized, roles. His laboratory studies pre-neoplastic diseases and cancers such as brain, prostrate and breast cancer.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Brian Browning , PhD

Email: browning@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 685-8482

Dr. Browning's research is focused on the development of statistical and computational methods for analysis of large-scale genetic data from microarray genotyping and next-generation sequencing. These genetic data sets present computational and analytical challenges due to their size, and due to the complex patterns of inter-marker correlation in the data. Carefully engineered algorithms and software are necessary to extract the full information from these rich data sets.

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Elizabeth Buffalo , PhD

Email: ebuffalo@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-1432

Dr. Buffalo's general research focus is to contribute to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms involved in learning and memory. She uses neurophysiological techniques to record information, simultaneously, from multiple electrodes in the hippocampus and surrounding cortex in awake, behaving monkeys. She investigates how changes in neuronal activity correlate with the monkey's ability to learn and remember, and she's particularly interested in the activity of neuronal networks that underlie learning and memory processes.

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