17 Search Results

q=Computer%20Science

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Cecilia Aragon , PhD

Email: aragon@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2567

Dr. Aragon's current research focuses on visual analytics, data science, collaborative creativity, emotion in text communication, text analytics, and the study of socio-technical systems including online text communication and social media. Her research group both develops software for and produces qualitative studies relating to the socio-technical aspects of data science with a focus on very large text data sets. Some of her other projects include the use of computer gaming for collaborative science and engineering learning and discovery, and topics related to usability and sustainability.

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Wyeth Bair , PhD

Email: wyeth0@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 221-8241

Dr. Bair's group integrates computational modeling and electrophysiology to study neural coding and cortical circuitry in the visual system. A primary focus of his work is the visual motion pathway. He is currently developing several integrated online resources to carry out his goals. These include the Neural Signal Archive, which contains neuronal data for public access; the Working Models site, which provides access to network models of the visual system; and the data system, which is a set of utilities for storing and analyzing spike trains.

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Magdalena (Magda) Balazinska , PhD

Email: magda@cs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-1069

Dr. Balazinska's research interests are in the field of database management systems. Her current research focuses on big data management, scientific data management, and cloud computing.

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Robert Bradley , PhD

Email: rbradley@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5662

Dr. Bradley uses genomics, sequence analysis, and molecular genetics to study the mechanistic origins and phenotypic consequences of alternative splicing and other RNA processing. He wants to identify diseases where RNA processing plays important, and previously unrecognized, roles. His laboratory studies pre-neoplastic diseases and cancers such as brain, prostrate and breast cancer.

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James (Jim) Brinkley , MD, PhD

Email: brinkley@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3954

Dr. Brinkley's primary research interest is biomedical informatics - the representation, management, sharing, visualization and utilization of neuroscience data and knowledge. He is the founder of the field of Structural Informatics, which has as its goal the development of methods for representing the structure of the body at multiple levels of detail, as for using these methods for organizing and integrating biomedical information. His aim is to find ways to represent the structure or the body in computer-readable form, and find ways to associate these representations with the myriad biomedical data that are available. His goal is to provide a structural information framework for integrating a huge variety of big and small biomedical data. Dr. Brinkley's projects have included anatomy education, brain mapping through the national Human Brain Project, cardiovascular data integration, clinical trials data integration through the national Clinical translational Science Awards, radiological image annotation and integration through the RadLex project, and craniofacial malformations data integration through the national FaceBase consortium. He is also interested in developing web-accessible computer applications utilizing these representations to solve practical problems in clinical medicine, research and education.

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Raphael Gottardo , PhD

Email: raph@rglab.org

Phone: (206) 667-4076

Dr. Gottardo is the principal investigator in the Gottardo Lab and Fred Hutch. His research focuses on developing methods and tools for high throughput, high dimensional experiments with applications in vaccine research and immunology. His team also works on flow cytometry, peptide microarrays, next generation sequencing, Bayesian inference and computation, and statistical computing.

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Noah Hoffman , MD, PhD

Email: ngh2@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-7932

Dr. Hoffman's clinical interests and responsibilities include the development and application of software and processes for the collection, management, and display of data generated in the clinical laboratory. His research is focused on creating applications and algorithms to classify medically important microorganisms using biological sequence information.

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Leroy (Lee) Hood , MD, PhD

Email: lhood@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1200

The Hood group is integrating biology, technology and computation to create a predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory approach to medicine. His projects center on cancer biology of prostate, glioblastoma and lung cancers, systems approach to prion disease in glioblastoma mouse models, new strategies for obtaining blood biomarkers, and a systems approach to diagnosis and stratification of disease.

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Eric Klavins , PhD

Email: klavins@ee.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-1743

Dr. Klavins is an associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He holds adjunct appointments in Computer Science and Engineering and in Bioengineering and is the Director for the UW Center for Synthetic Biology. Until approximately 2008, Klavins' research was primarily in computer science and control systems, focusing on stochastic processes, robotics and self-assembly. At about this time, he learned the basics of genetic engineering of the next few years switched entirely fields to synthetic biology and now runs an interdisplinary group of engineers, biologists, experimentalists, and theorists -- all focused on engineering life. His current projects include synthetic multicellular systems with engineered bacteria and yeast, modeling and design for synthetic multicellular systems, and laboratory automation.

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Jeffrey Ojemann , MD

Email: jojemann@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 987-4240

Dr. Ojemann's clinical interests include surgical treatment of epilepsy and of tumors near the brain tissue needed for thinking and speaking. His lab work focuses on using electrocorticography (ECoG) to answer basic neuroscience questions as well as to develop tools for clinical and rehabilitative applications. ECoG, which is used for long-term clinical monitoring of epilepsy patients, provides a unique opportunity to collect intracranial cortical data from awake, behaving humans. The group, under the direction of Dr. Ojemann, represents researchers from a wide range of backgrounds including neurosurgery, neurology, rehabilitative medicine, engineering, neuroscience, and physics. A major focus of the group is brain-computer interfaces; current projects include learning mechanisms, tactile feedback, and recursive stimulation. Also under investigation are more fundamental questions about cortical representation of simple and complex hand movements, the dynamics of cognition, language, and higher-order nonlinear interactions between brain areas. Other projects include integration of ECoG and fMRI and studies of temporal lobe epilepsy.

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Thomas Richardson , MD, FACC

Email: thomasr@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 685-8488

Dr. Richardson's main area of research, graphical models, has developed at the interface between statistics and computer science, but has origins and applications in econometrics, epidemiology, genomics, psychology, and sociology. In other words, graphs (composed of vertices and edges) provide a language for formulating complex hypotheses.

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Walter Ruzzo , PhD

Email: ruzzo@cs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-6298

Dr. Ruzzo's research is focused on development of computational methods and tools applicable to practical problems in molecular biology, an increasingly data-rich discipline. Recent work has focused on analysis of high throughput sequencing data, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIPseq) and transcriptomic (RNAseq) data, including development of new methods for mapping, assembly, bias correction, isoform quantitation, and motif discovery. New methods for finding noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes are also being actively developed.

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Paul Shannon ,

Phone: (206) 732-1423

Shannon's goal in bioinformatics and computational biology is to use exploratory and confirmatory data analysis, upon inference, and upon modeling to eventually permit the prediction and control of complex biological systems. He believes network visualizations -- molecular maps -- created from an open-ended programming environment rich in statistical power and data-handling facilities, such as RCytoscape, will play an essential role in this progression.

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Kari Stephens , PhD

Email: kstephen@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 221-0349

Dr. Stephens conducts research related to dissemination of evidenced base practices addressing mental health care and the leveraging of methods and tools focused on use of electronic health data to improve care. Her clinical expertise includes cognitive and behavioral based psychotherapy, including treatments for depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction, and chronic pain.

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Dan Suciu , PhD

Email: suciu@cs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 685-1934

Dr. Suciu is a full professor in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. He applies formal theory to novel and difficult data management tasks. Suciu's past work has addressed various aspects of managing semi-structured data, including query languages, compression, query processing and type inference. His more recent work includes data security and querying unreliable and inconsistent data sources.

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Peter Tarczy-Hornoch , MD, FACMI

Email: pth@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 685-8093

Dr. Tarczy-Hornoch's current research focuses on data integration of biomedical and health data. This includes looking at ways of handling semi structured data, representing uncertainty at various levels in the system, and doing computerized reasoning over integrated data. The main problems he is focusing on are large scale functional gene annotation of bacteria and protozoans; single-nucleotide polymorphisms for elucidation of disease mechanisms; expression array experiment analysis; and research in the area of collaborative integrated analysis of a combination of clinical data, experimental biological data, and clinical/translational research study data.

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Ka Yee Yeung , PhD

Email: kayee@uw.edu

Phone: (253) 692-4924

Dr. Yeung has extensive experience in the design of algorithms for the mining and integration of big data. She also has research expertise/interest spanning multiple disciplines, including computer science, statistics, computational biology, cancer biology and systems biology.

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