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q=Mentoring

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Neil Abernathy , PhD

Email: neila@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-2813

Dr. Abernathy's current research interests are public health informatics standards, epidemic models, and molecular epidemiology in the context of global health; scientific and social networks as they pertain to collaborative research; novel 3-D imaging displays; Environmental interventions for infectious disease; high-throughput biology; and evolutionary game theory.

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Cecilia Aragon , PhD

Email: aragon@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-2567

Dr. Aragon's current research focuses on visual analytics, data science, collaborative creativity, emotion in text communication, text analytics, and the study of socio-technical systems including online text communication and social media. Her research group both develops software for and produces qualitative studies relating to the socio-technical aspects of data science with a focus on very large text data sets. Some of her other projects include the use of computer gaming for collaborative science and engineering learning and discovery, and topics related to usability and sustainability.

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Wyeth Bair , PhD

Email: wyeth0@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 221-8241

Dr. Bair's group integrates computational modeling and electrophysiology to study neural coding and cortical circuitry in the visual system. A primary focus of his work is the visual motion pathway. He is currently developing several integrated online resources to carry out his goals. These include the Neural Signal Archive, which contains neuronal data for public access; the Working Models site, which provides access to network models of the visual system; and the data system, which is a set of utilities for storing and analyzing spike trains.

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Geoffrey Baird , MD, PhD

Email: gbaird@uw.edu

Phone: (206)744-9787

Dr. Baird's clinical interests include laboratory test utilization, molecular diagnostics, proteomics and immunohistochemistry. His group has developed a new proteomic technology for biomarker discovery in a range of diseases such as malignancies, cardiovascular disorders, and inflammatory conditions. One application of their technology is to discover protein expression changes associated with non-small cell lung cancer that have implications for diagnosis and treatment.

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Magdalena (Magda) Balazinska , PhD

Email: magda@cs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-1069

Dr. Balazinska's research interests are in the field of database management systems. Her current research focuses on big data management, scientific data management, and cloud computing.

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Nitin Baliga , PhD

Email: nbaliga@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1266

Dr. Baliga leads a group which builds predictive models of complex biological phenomena that can be used to guide cells in the fight against disease, they have established numerous collaborations to apply this methodology to wide-ranging problems from climate change to cancer. In ongoing research, Dr. Baliga is applying advanced methods to the study of brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) to gain insights into human disease to improve prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

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Tania Bardyn , MLIS, AHIP

Email: bardyn@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-0422

Ms. Bardyn's research has focused on evaluating the information needs of clinicians and translational researchers in various disciplines; how to deliver information programs and librarian services to develop collaborative partnerships and library buildings and space planning.

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Shirley Beresford , PhD, MSc, MA

Email: beresfrd@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-9512

Dr. Beresford's research interests are in the areas of nutritional epidemiology and chronic disease prevention; specifically designed to improve the scientific basis for public health policy and recommendations concerning dietary intake, physical activity and intake of folic acid.

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Alice Berger , PhD

Email: ahberger@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6281

The goal of the Berger laboratory is to enable precision medicine by systematically uncovering the molecular alterations in cancer, determining the function of these variant alleles, and understanding how these alleles modulate response to targeted or immune-based therapies. Although many of the genes involved in cancer have now been identified, a major challenge is discovering which specific alleles of these genes are involved and how these alleles modulate therapeutic response. We combine functional genomics, computational biology, biochemistry, and genetics to understand the mechanism of somatic cancer variants. Our goal is to identify drug targets and biomarkers and to translate this knowledge into clinical benefit for patients.

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Slobodan Beronja , PhD

Email: beronja@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7609

Dr. Beronja's group studies molecular and cellular mechanisms essential for tissue growth during development and the formation of tumors. His goal is to identifying genes and gene pathways that can be used as targets in cancer therapy.

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Parveen Bhatti , PhD

Email: pbhatti@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7803

Dr. Bhatti's research focus is on occupational and environmental epidemiology of cancer with a focus in biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and disease; particularly genetic susceptibility to cancer following low dose exposure to occupational or medical ionizing radiation.

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Hamid Bolouri , PhD

Email: hbolouri@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2748

Dr. Bolouri is interested in understanding how gene regulatory interactions control cellular state and identity, both in normal development and in diseases such as cancer. A particular focus of his lab is the development and use of integrative computational systems biology methods to map gene regulatory networks from whole genome data: currently they are working on identification of cis-regulatory sequence variations in childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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Karol Bomsztyk , MD

Email: karolb@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-7949

Dr. Bomstyzk areas of research interest include pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases; epigenetics of inflammation and infection; and epigenetics of HIV infection.

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Stephen Bowen , PhD

Email: srbowen@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-1128

Dr. Bowen's research focuses on quantitative molecular imaging of cancer and normal tissue for personalized radiation therapy. Specifically he is interested in machine learning of respiratory patterns for personalized motion management strategies during image acquisition, radiotherapy planning, and radiotherapy delivery; dose painting based on respiratory-gated FDG PET in NSCLC; and functional avoidance planning of both MAA and DTPA SPECT-defined lung regions in NSCLC and SC SPECT-defined liver regions in HCC.

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Robert Bradley , PhD

Email: rbradley@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-5662

Dr. Bradley uses genomics, sequence analysis, and molecular genetics to study the mechanistic origins and phenotypic consequences of alternative splicing and other RNA processing. He wants to identify diseases where RNA processing plays important, and previously unrecognized, roles. His laboratory studies pre-neoplastic diseases and cancers such as brain, prostrate and breast cancer.

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Linda Breeden , PhD

Email: lbreeden@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4484

Dr. Breeden's research is focused on understanding how the commitment to the mitotic cell cycle is regulated in response to environmental and internal cues. The critical transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle are controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). In budding yeast, as in all higher eukaryotes, the decision to commit to another division cycle occurs in G1. Nine cyclins have been identified that bind and activate a single CDK, and three of these cyclins (Cln1,2 and 3) play critical roles in modulating the decision to enter the cell cycle. Her lab's long term goal has been to understand how the commitment to the mitotic cell cycle is regulated in response to environmental and internal cues. Most of this work has been done with rapidly growing cells and with cells subjected to DNA damage.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Roger Bumgarner , PhD

Email: rogerb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 732-6137

Dr. Bumgarner's research is focused on the creation of tools to connect expression data to biological meaning and the application of these tools to understanding host-virus interactions and the host innate immune response.

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Chu Chen , PhD, NRCC, DABCC

Email: cchen@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6644

Dr. Chen's research interests include the identification of 1) diagnostic and prognostic markers to aid personalized management of head and neck cancer based on gene expression profiles, loss of heterozygosity, DNA copy number, and tissue microarray data.; and 2) determinants for the susceptibility to and survival from cancers of the head and neck, lung, endometrium, breast, prostate and testes through investigations into lifestyle factors, endogenous and environmental exposures, and genetic and epigenetic influences.

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Deborah Donnell , PhD

Email: deborah@scharp.org

Phone: (206) 667-5661

Dr. Donnell is a Principal Staff Scientist in the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute (VIDI). She is the Principal Investigator of the HIV Prevention Trials Network Statistical and Data Management Center. The scientific faculty, drawing from the University of Washington Biostatistics department and the Population Sciences Program in VIDI, are responsible for the design and analysis of Phase III clinical trials to access the efficacy of biomedical and behavioral interventions to prevent the transmission of HIV

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