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q=Pancreas

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Smith (Jim) Apisarnthanarax , MD

Email: apisarn@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-4100

Dr. Apisarnthanarax is a radiation oncologist with clinical expertise in gastrointestinal cancers and genitourinary tumors, including the use of proton radiation to treat these cancers. Dr. Apisarnthanarax's research interests include optimizing the treatment of liver cancers, integrating proton beam radiation therapy into the multidisciplinary care of cancer, and using novel functional imaging to personalize cancer care by decreasing normal tissue toxicity and assessing cancer treatment response.

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Mike Averkiou , PhD

Email: maverk@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-9558

Dr. Averkiou develops new ultrasound imaging and therapy technology for disease detection, improved cancer treatment and monitoring, improved drug delivery to targeted cells, and heart disease. Using advanced nonlinear imaging techniques and microbubble contrast agents, he is able to detect the earliest stages of tumor angiogenesis and atherosclerosis, and closely monitor their treatment. He focuses on transferring innovations from preclinical research into clinical use.

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Anthony Back , MD

Email: tonyback@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 288-6426

Dr. Back is a medical oncologist who specializes in treating cancers of the gastrointestinal system. Dr. Back also treats patients at SCCA. His patients include people with colorectal, liver, pancreatic, and stomach cancer. He is an expert in communication between physicians and patients and has published a number of papers on this topic.

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Geoffrey Baird , MD, PhD

Email: gbaird@uw.edu

Phone: (206)744-9787

Dr. Baird's clinical interests include laboratory test utilization, molecular diagnostics, proteomics and immunohistochemistry. His group has developed a new proteomic technology for biomarker discovery in a range of diseases such as malignancies, cardiovascular disorders, and inflammatory conditions. One application of their technology is to discover protein expression changes associated with non-small cell lung cancer that have implications for diagnosis and treatment.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Teresa Brentnall , MD

Email: teribr@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 897-1821

Dr. Brentnall research interest is in understanding tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal tract with emphasis in: molecular events and early detection of pancreatic cancer; surveillance and management of patients who inherit pancreatic cancer; molecular events, prevention, and early detection of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

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James (Jim) Brinkley , MD, PhD

Email: brinkley@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3954

Dr. Brinkley's primary research interest is biomedical informatics - the representation, management, sharing, visualization and utilization of neuroscience data and knowledge. He is the founder of the field of Structural Informatics, which has as its goal the development of methods for representing the structure of the body at multiple levels of detail, as for using these methods for organizing and integrating biomedical information. His aim is to find ways to represent the structure or the body in computer-readable form, and find ways to associate these representations with the myriad biomedical data that are available. His goal is to provide a structural information framework for integrating a huge variety of big and small biomedical data. Dr. Brinkley's projects have included anatomy education, brain mapping through the national Human Brain Project, cardiovascular data integration, clinical trials data integration through the national Clinical translational Science Awards, radiological image annotation and integration through the RadLex project, and craniofacial malformations data integration through the national FaceBase consortium. He is also interested in developing web-accessible computer applications utilizing these representations to solve practical problems in clinical medicine, research and education.

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David Byrd , MD

Email: byrd@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-7512

Dr. Byrd’s clinical interests are in the areas of surgical oncology, endocrine neoplasms (thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal), gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancers, breast cancer, melanoma. His research interests are to study the molecular changes in pancreatic cancer, genetic and clinical studies on melanoma, and lymphatic mapping in breast cancer and melanoma. He is an expert in many surgical procedures, including the Whipple procedure used in pancreas cancer treatment.

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David Chhieng , MD, MBA, MSHI, MSEM, MA (HON)

Email: dchhieng@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-3315

Dr. Chhieng is director of Anatomic Pathology and a UW profession of pathology. He is surgical pathologist, with expertise in cytopathology, especially in performing and interpreting fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA). Dr. Chhieng is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, Cytopathology, and Clinical Informatics.

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Stacey Cohen , MD

Email: shiovitz@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 667-5702

Dr. Shiovitz is a medical oncologist who specializes in treating people with colorectal and other gastrointestinal cancers. Her areas of expertise include colorectal cancer, early onset cancer, hereditary cancers, and gastrointestinal cancers

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Andrew Coveler , MD

Email: acoveler@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 288-7509

Dr. Coveler is a medical oncologist who treats cancers of the gastrointestinal system. His clinical expertise is in the areas of Gastrointestinal oncology, clinical immunotherapy and early phase clinical trials of new cancer drugs and immune-based treatments like vaccines and antibodies.

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Marianne Dubard-Gault , MD, MS

Email: mdg2019@uw.edu

Dr. Dubard-Gault is the medical director of the Cancer Genetics Program at SCCA. Her main research interest is to better understand how genetic information influences patients’ decision-making about health care and life choices. She is also interested in exploring ways to help people better access medical genetic information, talk about it with their families and use that knowledge to make decisions that fit their goals.

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Philip Greenberg , MD

Email: pgreen@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-8306

Dr. Greenberg's laboratory is involved in studies elucidating the immunobiology of host T cell responses to infectious viruses and transformed cells. His group used adoptive therapy approach with cloned T cells to both, elucidate the immunobiology of human malignancies and infections and to develop novel immune-based therapies. Clinical trials of adoptive T cell therapy are now underway in patients with leukemia.

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Taran Gujral , PhD, Msc

Email: tgujral@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4149

Cells respond to external stimuli by activating nonlinear and highly interconnected networks of signaling proteins. Dr. Gujral's work focuses on understanding how these networks are wired in different cell types and how they influence response to growth factors or cytotoxic agents using both hypothesis driven and systems-based data-driven approaches. His lab combines approaches from molecular genetics with cell and systems biology to study a recently discovered Wnt5-Fzd2 signaling pathway in metastasis as well as cell-to-cell contact in regulating cell fate decisions.

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Barry Gumbiner , PhD

Email: gumbiner@uw.edu

Phone: 206-884-5116

Dr. Gumbiner and his team study how cadherin cell adhesion molecules and associated catenin proteins control tumor development and progression. Cadherins and catenins play important roles in the morphogenesis, maintenance, and regeneration of tissues, and alterations in their functions are important in cancer. One major effort of the laboratory is to understand how cadherins signal into the cell to control growth and differentiation through regulation of both the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway and the Hippo signaling pathway; the latter inhibits cell proliferation and participates in organ size control. Cadherins mediate contact inhibition of growth by stimulating the Hippo pathway, while growth factors, such as EGF, inhibit the Hippo pathway. They are investigating how these modes of regulation of the Hippo pathway affect the development of different types of tumors. Another major effort of the laboratory is to understand how cadherin adhesive function at the cell surface is regulated to control tissue architecture and tumor cell invasion. Loss of E-cadherin expression associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is known to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis. However, many tumors and metastases retain E-cadherin expression, and they have found that instead it can be inactivated at the cell surface to cause the loss in function. They have generated a novel class of monoclonal antibodies that activate E-cadherin at the cell surface to restore its adhesive function, and are evaluating whether they reduce tumor invasion and metastasis in animal models. He and his team are also studying how catenins and cancer-associated mutations in E-cadherin affect its ability to switch to the active state and regulate tumor development. The mechanisms by which cadherins and catenins affect tumor growth are varied and complex and offer potential approaches for intervention.

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William Harris , MD

Email: wph3@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 288-6856

Dr. William Harris specializes in caring for people with hepatobiliary, pancreatic, and gastrointestinal malignancies including pancreas, colon, rectal, anal, gastric, esophageal, and neuroendocrine tumors. His research interests include, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and clinical trials combining chemotherapy and biologic therapies.

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Sunil Hingorani , MD, PhD

Email: srh@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6921

Dr. Hingorani is a medical oncologist who specializes in the care of pancreas cancer patients. He also runs a translational research program dedicated to uncovering mechanisms of pancreas cancer formation and developing new early detection and treatment strategies. His laboratory research involves the study of molecular and cellular origins of pancreas cancer primarily through the use of genetically engineered mouse models.

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Noah Hoffman , MD, PhD

Email: ngh2@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-7932

Dr. Hoffman's clinical interests and responsibilities include the development and application of software and processes for the collection, management, and display of data generated in the clinical laboratory. His research is focused on creating applications and algorithms to classify medically important microorganisms using biological sequence information.

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Leroy (Lee) Hood , MD, PhD

Email: lhood@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1200

The Hood group is integrating biology, technology and computation to create a predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory approach to medicine. His projects center on cancer biology of prostate, glioblastoma and lung cancers, systems approach to prion disease in glioblastoma mouse models, new strategies for obtaining blood biomarkers, and a systems approach to diagnosis and stratification of disease.

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