33 Search Results

q=Systems%20Biology

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Neil Abernathy , PhD

Email: neila@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-2813

Dr. Abernathy's current research interests are public health informatics standards, epidemic models, and molecular epidemiology in the context of global health; scientific and social networks as they pertain to collaborative research; novel 3-D imaging displays; Environmental interventions for infectious disease; high-throughput biology; and evolutionary game theory.

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Erica Anderson-Nissen , PhD

Email: eanderse@fhcrc.org

Phone: +27 (0)21 202 2228

Dr. Andersen-Nissen is interested in studying the influence of early innate immune responses to HIV vaccines on subsequent adaptive immune responses elicited. In addition, she studies systems biology analyses of how immune responses are shaped.

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Steve Andrews , PhD

Email: sandrews@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7007

Dr. Andrews's research is in the interdisciplinary field of systems biology. His interests are in the combination of physics, chemistry, and biology methods to investigate organization within biological systems, on size scales that typically range from a few proteins to many cells. Results are yielding insights into how the highly structured macroscopic world of living organisms is built from the stochastic microscopic world of individual molecules. He is also providing an improved conceptual foundation for medical and biotechnology developments, with impacts on topics such as drug discovery, personalized medicine, biofuel generation, and bioremediation.

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Justin Ashworth , PhD

Email: Justin.Ashworth@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-2179

Dr. Ashworth is interested in the modeling and prediction of molecular and genetic variations in cellular systems, and the ways in which the functions and interactions of proteins are "designed" in nature to yield cellular physiologies and adaptations. Recently I have been studying gene regulation of new microorganisms and the functional roles of mutations in cellular systems in order to relate our biophysical understanding of molecular function and evolution to systems-level characteristics.

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Nitin Baliga , PhD

Email: nbaliga@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1266

Dr. Baliga leads a group which builds predictive models of complex biological phenomena that can be used to guide cells in the fight against disease, they have established numerous collaborations to apply this methodology to wide-ranging problems from climate change to cancer. In ongoing research, Dr. Baliga is applying advanced methods to the study of brain cancer (glioblastoma multiforme) to gain insights into human disease to improve prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

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Karl Bohringer , PhD

Email: karlb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 221-5177

Dr. Bohringer's current research interests include micromanipulation and microassembly, as well as biomedical implants and bioMEMS for single-cell genomics and proteomics. There are two major research themes in his work: Controlling surfaces and interfacial forces at the micro and nano scale, including systems for controlled self-assembly of microcomponents, programmable surfaces whose local properties (for example, hydrophobicity) can be changed on demand, and MEMS actuator arrays and microrobots for moving tiny objects; Joining MEMS and biology by integrating new biomaterials into MEMS processes and devices, biomedical sensor implants, and microfluidic chips for handling and analyzing biological samples. Dr. Bohringer is also interested in discussing ideas for leveraging the unique capabilities of the Washington Nanofabrication Facility for research programs in the biomedical field.

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Hamid Bolouri , PhD

Email: hbolouri@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-2748

Dr. Bolouri is interested in understanding how gene regulatory interactions control cellular state and identity, both in normal development and in diseases such as cancer. A particular focus of his lab is the development and use of integrative computational systems biology methods to map gene regulatory networks from whole genome data: currently they are working on identification of cis-regulatory sequence variations in childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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Karol Bomsztyk , MD

Email: karolb@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-7949

Dr. Bomstyzk areas of research interest include pathogenesis of bacterial, fungal and parasitic diseases; epigenetics of inflammation and infection; and epigenetics of HIV infection.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Roger Bumgarner , PhD

Email: rogerb@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 732-6137

Dr. Bumgarner's research is focused on the creation of tools to connect expression data to biological meaning and the application of these tools to understanding host-virus interactions and the host innate immune response.

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Zhijun Duan , PhD

Email: zjduan@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3363

Dr. Duan's research is focused on the relationship between the form and function of human genomes during development and tumorigenesis. One of the striking features of the eukaryotic nucleus is that chromosomes adopt preferred conformations that vary across different tissues and developmental stages.

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David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

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Stephen Friend , MD, PhD

Email: friend@sagebase.org

Phone: (206) 667-2101

Dr. Stephen Friend is a world leader in efforts to make large scale, data-intensive biology more openly accessible to citizens and the entire research community in order to accelerate scientific progress. He is a co-founder of Sage Bionetworks, a nonprofit institute working to create an open-access Internet database for researchers worldwide to share their genomic data. Sage bionetworks is hosted by Fred Hutchinson Cancer research Center and its goal to build predictive models of cancer.

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Gustavo Glusman , PhD

Email: gustavo.glusman@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1273

Dr. Glusman uses computational approaches to investigate genome structure and evolution; multi-gene families; prediction and discovery of genes and transcripts; genes not coding for proteins; visualization of complex data; and image analysis. His algorithms are contributing to the discovery of genes that are not easily identified using standard procedures, to the interpretation of large-scale transcriptomic and genomic data, and to the study of disease genetics.

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Raphael Gottardo , PhD

Email: raph@rglab.org

Phone: (206) 667-4076

Dr. Gottardo is the principal investigator in the Gottardo Lab and Fred Hutch. His research focuses on developing methods and tools for high throughput, high dimensional experiments with applications in vaccine research and immunology. His team also works on flow cytometry, peptide microarrays, next generation sequencing, Bayesian inference and computation, and statistical computing.

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Taran Gujral , PhD, Msc

Email: tgujral@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4149

Cells respond to external stimuli by activating nonlinear and highly interconnected networks of signaling proteins. Dr. Gujral's work focuses on understanding how these networks are wired in different cell types and how they influence response to growth factors or cytotoxic agents using both hypothesis driven and systems-based data-driven approaches. His lab combines approaches from molecular genetics with cell and systems biology to study a recently discovered Wnt5-Fzd2 signaling pathway in metastasis as well as cell-to-cell contact in regulating cell fate decisions.

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Leroy (Lee) Hood , MD, PhD

Email: lhood@systemsbiology.org

Phone: (206) 732-1200

The Hood group is integrating biology, technology and computation to create a predictive, personalized, preventive and participatory approach to medicine. His projects center on cancer biology of prostate, glioblastoma and lung cancers, systems approach to prion disease in glioblastoma mouse models, new strategies for obtaining blood biomarkers, and a systems approach to diagnosis and stratification of disease.

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Eric Klavins , PhD

Email: klavins@ee.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-1743

Dr. Klavins is an associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. He holds adjunct appointments in Computer Science and Engineering and in Bioengineering and is the Director for the UW Center for Synthetic Biology. Until approximately 2008, Klavins' research was primarily in computer science and control systems, focusing on stochastic processes, robotics and self-assembly. At about this time, he learned the basics of genetic engineering of the next few years switched entirely fields to synthetic biology and now runs an interdisplinary group of engineers, biologists, experimentalists, and theorists -- all focused on engineering life. His current projects include synthetic multicellular systems with engineered bacteria and yeast, modeling and design for synthetic multicellular systems, and laboratory automation.

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Alvin Liu , PhD

Email: aliu@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 221-0603

Dr. Liu is interested in urologic tissue repair and renewal involving intercellular signaling and cell-cell interaction. His lab work concerns cancer cell biology - the involvement of cell-cell interaction through signaling molecules and cell contact in the development of tumor and gene expression changes in tumor cell types.

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Qinghang (Chris) Liu , PhD

Email: qcliu@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 685-9133

Dr. Liu's research is focused on defining novel signaling and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In his lab, they take multi-disciplinary approaches including biochemistry, molecular and cell biology, molecular genetics, and system physiology to understand the molecular basis of heart disease using model systems ranging from yeast cell system to genetic mouse models.

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