25 Search Results

q=Translational%20Bioinformatics

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J David Beatty , MD

Email: David.beatty@swedish.org

Phone: (206) 320-4880

Dr. Beatty's practice and academic activities have been focused on breast cancer. His clinical practice emphasizes management of patients with complex breast care and breast cancer problems. His surgical expertise includes breast biopsy, minimally invasive technology, ultrasound guided procedures, sentinel node localization and biopsy, breast conserving surgery, oncoplastic surgery, axillary preserving surgery, image guided surgery, balloon catheter placement for partial breast irradiation, bloodless surgery, and integration of surgery and multidisciplinary care.

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Chu Chen , PhD, NRCC, DABCC

Email: cchen@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6644

Dr. Chen's research interests include the identification of 1) diagnostic and prognostic markers to aid personalized management of head and neck cancer based on gene expression profiles, loss of heterozygosity, DNA copy number, and tissue microarray data.; and 2) determinants for the susceptibility to and survival from cancers of the head and neck, lung, endometrium, breast, prostate and testes through investigations into lifestyle factors, endogenous and environmental exposures, and genetic and epigenetic influences.

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Keith Eaton , MD, PhD

Email: kdeaton@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 288-7485

Dr. Eaton applies expert research knowledge to treating patients with lung cancer. His clinical expertise is in the areas of lung cancer, head and neck cancer, thyroid cancer, and cancer of unknown primary. His research interests include Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapies.

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Min Fang , MD, PhD

Email: fangm@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 288-1390

Dr. Fang's research focus is on the genomics and combinatorial genetics/epigenetics of human neoplasia. She is combining classical genetic approaches of mapping, karyotyping, and functional genetics with new genomic tools including microarray, comparative genome hybridization, and next-generation sequencing, to identify genetic and epigenetic aberrations in cancer that may serve as actionable biomarkers for treatment decision making for individual patients.

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David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

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David Hockenbery , MD

Email: dhockenb@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4611

Dr. Hockenbery specializes in gastroenterology and the genetic and biochemical mechanisms of apoptosis. Currently his group is focusing on: Investigation of the role of the c-myc transcription factor in bioenergetic regulation in cell growth and division, neoplastic transformation and apoptosis; Analysis of cell signaling and transcriptional responses to nutrient excess, employed in cells susceptible to neoplastic transformation.

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Noah Hoffman , MD, PhD

Email: ngh2@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-7932

Dr. Hoffman's clinical interests and responsibilities include the development and application of software and processes for the collection, management, and display of data generated in the clinical laboratory. His research is focused on creating applications and algorithms to classify medically important microorganisms using biological sequence information.

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Eric Holland , MD, PhD

Email: eholland@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6117

Dr. Holland is a neurosurgeon and brain cancer researcher. His research goal is to address the molecular basis of brain tumors and develop new treatment approaches. His research focuses on developing mouse models of brain cancer that mimic how the disease behaves in patients. He has vast experience in conducting clinical trials in glioma patients and developing imaging strategies to follow mouse brain tumors as they develop a powerful system that is used to test promising new drugs.

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Marshall Horwitz , MD, PhD

Email: horwitz@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 616-4566

Dr. Marshall Horwitz is an internist and clinical medical geneticist whose research interests relate to genetic factors predisposing to hematopoietic malignancy and the clonal evolution of cancer. The major focus of his research centers on defining the genetic origins of cancers of the blood and using that as a paradigm for further understanding development. His laboratory employs genetic mapping and sequencing strategies to identify genes responsible for familial predisposition to leukemia, lymphoma, and bone marrow failure syndromes. In related work, Dr. Horwitz's laboratory has developed a new approach for mapping cell fate during development by inferring the order in which mutations accumulate in somatic tissues.

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Michael LeBlanc , PhD

Email: mleblanc@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6089

Dr. LeBlanc's current research interests are statistical methods for clinical trials, adaptive and non-parametric regression models, and survival analysis. Some of his current projects are in the SWOG Statistical Center and Statistical Methods for Clinical Studies.

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Shuying (Sue) Li , PhD

Email: sli@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7066

Dr. Li is a senior scientist, whose research interests include development of genetic statistical methodologies, including phylogenetic tree reconstruction from genetic sequences, association of genetic markers with diseases, prediction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles from other polymorphisms such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), host genetics association with human immunity, especially immune-related diseases such as HIV infection and progression.

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Georg Luebeck , PhD

Email: gluebeck@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4282

Dr. Luebeck focuses primarily on the development of biomathematical descriptions of carcinogenesis, the identification and characterization of relevant spatio-temporal scales, and their impact on cancer incidence. The ultimate goal of his research is to being able to model/optimize the benefits of cancer screening, prevention, and intervention - based on a biological description of the natural history of cancer.

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Chris Miller , PhD

Email: cpmiller@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-3363

Dr. Miller works in Dr. Hootie Warren’s lab and is spearheading the development of a human microphysiological “tumor-on-a-chip” for accelerating investigation of the barriers to T cell immunotherapy in the solid tumor microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and the vascular endothelium. Efforts are focused on the most common type of kidney cancer, renal cell carcinoma. Dr. Miller has experience developing the human 3D vascularized renal-cell-carcinoma-on-a-chip that faithfully recapitulates angiogenic blood vessel sprouting in the presence of patient tumor spheroids but not normal-adjacent kidney cells. The tumor-on-a-chip approach is broadly applicable to a variety of solid tumors.

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Peter Nelson , MD

Email: pnelson@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-3377

Dr. Nelson is an oncologist specializing in therapies for early- and late-stage prostate cancer, pathology, and genome sciences. The focus of current work in the Nelson lab involves efforts to uncover how prostate cancer forms. The goal is to create tools to diagnose the onset of prostate cancer, develop prognostic strategies, and help develop more effective therapies for treating this disease.

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Colin Pritchard , MD, PhD

Email: cpritch@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-8400

Dr. Pritchard specializes in cancer molecular diagnostics development for precision medicine and microRNA as blood-based biomarkers and he helped to develop UW-OncoPlex (a molecular test which can inform diagnosis, prognosis, and/or treatment plans for patients). His research is focused on two main areas related to cancer molecular diagnostics: microRNA as blood-based biomarkers, and cancer molecular diagnostics development for precision medicine.

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Min Shi , PhD

Email: mshi70@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 897-5707

Dr. Shi has a broad background and specific expertise in protein engineering, gene expression regulation, and signal transduction in disease settings. At the University of Washington School of Medicine, Dr. Shi has expanded his research to include proteomics-based discovery and targeted validation of candidate proteins in in vitro models. He has also led or was critically involved in projects to apply the proteomic-based discoveries, and other important proteins, as biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

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Brian Shirts , MD, PhD

Email: shirtsb@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-0557

Dr. Shirt's research focuses on integrating complex genetics knowledge into clinical care. There are several related aspects of this research: clinical classification of rare variants, particularly variants in familial cancer genes; improving the use of complex and multi-factorial clinical information, with special interest in personalized healthcare using genetic information; and storage and communication of genetic information in the health care setting (including formatting genetic test results so that they are searchable in clinical laboratory information systems and so that electronic health records can use genetics to provide active decision support).

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Robert Stewart , PhD

Email: trawets@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-7951

Dr. Stewart's research is focused on biologically guided radiation therapy (BGRT), outcome assessment, and treatment individualization using biological metrics, such as the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically equivalent dose (BED) concepts.

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Peter Tarczy-Hornoch , MD, FACMI

Email: pth@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 685-8093

Dr. Tarczy-Hornoch's current research focuses on data integration of biomedical and health data. This includes looking at ways of handling semi structured data, representing uncertainty at various levels in the system, and doing computerized reasoning over integrated data. The main problems he is focusing on are large scale functional gene annotation of bacteria and protozoans; single-nucleotide polymorphisms for elucidation of disease mechanisms; expression array experiment analysis; and research in the area of collaborative integrated analysis of a combination of clinical data, experimental biological data, and clinical/translational research study data.

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