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q=Vaginal

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Geoffrey Baird , MD, PhD

Email: gbaird@uw.edu

Phone: (206)744-9787

Dr. Baird's clinical interests include laboratory test utilization, molecular diagnostics, proteomics and immunohistochemistry. His group has developed a new proteomic technology for biomarker discovery in a range of diseases such as malignancies, cardiovascular disorders, and inflammatory conditions. One application of their technology is to discover protein expression changes associated with non-small cell lung cancer that have implications for diagnosis and treatment.

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Ruanne Barnabas , MBChB, DPhil

Email: rbarnaba@uw.edu

Phone: 206 520-3813

Dr. Barnabas is an Infectious Disease Physician-Scientist at the University of Washington and affiliate at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Her research focuses on HIV treatment and prevention, specifically on interventions that reduce HIV viral load and, consequently, disease progression and transmission. Her projects use both empiric data and mathematical models to better understand HIV clinical progression and transmission, and estimate the potential impact of HIV interventions at population level. The ultimate aim of her work is to estimate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV treatment and prevention interventions to inform clinical trial design.

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Roger Brent , PhD

Email: rbrent@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1482

Dr. Brent studies the quantitative operation of the systems that living cells use to sense, represent, transmit, and act upon information to make decisions that determine their future fates. He specifically studies prototypic cell signaling systems in budding yeast and the pheromone response system; he has extended similar work to systems operating in single cells of tissues in a metazoan, Caenorhabditis elegans.

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Mac Cheever , MD

Email: mcheever@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4141

Dr. Cheever's specialty is in the areas of medical oncology, immunotherapy and solid tumor research. His current research interests are in conducting cancer clinical trials to develop and test new immunotherapies. He also interested on developing the principles of T cell therapy, cancer antigen discovery and development of cancer vaccines, especially for breast cancer.

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Chu Chen , PhD, NRCC, DABCC

Email: cchen@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-6644

Dr. Chen's research interests include the identification of 1) diagnostic and prognostic markers to aid personalized management of head and neck cancer based on gene expression profiles, loss of heterozygosity, DNA copy number, and tissue microarray data.; and 2) determinants for the susceptibility to and survival from cancers of the head and neck, lung, endometrium, breast, prostate and testes through investigations into lifestyle factors, endogenous and environmental exposures, and genetic and epigenetic influences.

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David Chhieng , MD, MBA, MSHI, MSEM, MA (HON)

Email: dchhieng@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-3315

Dr. Chhieng is director of Anatomic Pathology and a UW profession of pathology. He is surgical pathologist, with expertise in cytopathology, especially in performing and interpreting fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA). Dr. Chhieng is board certified in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, Cytopathology, and Clinical Informatics.

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Charles Drescher , MD

Email: cdresche@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-7459

Dr. Drescher is a gynecologic cancer specialist who treats women with gynecologic cancers, as well as women with complex benign gynecological conditions. His areas of expertise include: Cervical Cancer, da Vinci (Robot-Assisted Surgery), Endometrial Cancer, Endometriosis, Fibroids, Gynecologic Cancer Surgery (Robotic), Hysterectomy (Robotic), Ovarian Cancer, Pelvic Prolapse. In addition, he co-leads a SPORE project focused on molecular targets for ovarian cancer prognosis and therapy.

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David Fredricks , MD

Email: dfredric@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-1935

Dr. Fredricks's lab has identified several fastidious bacterial species that are useful markers of BV and are associated with adverse health outcomes. They are using novel cultivation methods to propagate some of these bacteria in the lab, and study how indigenous microbes interact with each other and the human host. He is currently looking for collaboration in molecular biology, microbiology, immunology, and cell biology. He is also looking for collaborators to focus on clinical epidemiology by studying microbial ecology in different human hosts.

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Denise Galloway , PhD

Email: dgallowa@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4500

Dr. Galloway's lab is interested in the mechanisms by which human papillomaviruses (HPVs) contribute to epithelial cancers. Most of their research has focused on the E6 and E7 oncogenes of the HPVs that have a high risk of progression to cervical cancers, such as HPV 16. In addition to mechanistic studies, the Galloway lab has had long-standing collaborations with epidemiologists and clinicians to understand the natural history of genital HPV infections, and the risk factors that cause only a small subset of women infected with high risk HPVs to progress to cancer. More recently, they have begun to study a different group of HPVs, known as the genus beta HPVs. These beta HPVs commonly infect skin, and may play a role in squamous cell skin cancers (SCSC). They have developed new serologic assays to detect antibodies to many HPVs and to human polyomaviruses.

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Stephen Hawes , PhD

Email: hawes@u.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 616-9744

Dr. Hawes's primary interests are in human papillomavirus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). His current research is conducted in Seattle and Senegal, West Africa and concerns the role of HIV, HPV and other sexually transmitted infections in the natural history of cervical neoplasia and cancer, as well as the study of biomarkers for various cancers including cancer of the cervix, anus, lung, breast, and skin. He is also interested in Alzheimer's disease.

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Noah Hoffman , MD, PhD

Email: ngh2@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-7932

Dr. Hoffman's clinical interests and responsibilities include the development and application of software and processes for the collection, management, and display of data generated in the clinical laboratory. His research is focused on creating applications and algorithms to classify medically important microorganisms using biological sequence information.

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Linda Ko , PhD, MPH

Email: lko@fhcrc.org

Phone: (206) 667-7182

Dr. Ko is the director of the Center for Health Communication Intervention (CHEALCI). She is a behavioral scientist with expertise in the development, testing, and evaluation of health communication strategies. Her work draws from the discipline of communication, marketing, social epidemiology, and social and behavioral sciences. Her research aims to understand community behavior within the socio-cultural context, develop interventions that will address those behaviors and translate knowledge through community-based participatory research.

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Margaret Madeleine , PhD

Email: mmadelei@fredhutch.org

Phone: (206) 667-4629

Dr. Madeleine's major research focus is on the molecular epidemiology of pathogens and our immune response to them that may be associated with cancer development and prognosis. She is also interested in the common drivers behind the role that chronic subclinical inflammation (such as occurs with age, obesity, physical inactivity, hormone use, and UV exposure) plays in cancer.

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Constance (Connie) Mao , MD

Email: maoc@uw.edu

Dr. Mao's research interests include screening methods for cervical cancer, treatment of genital dysplasias and HPV vaccine development.

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Andrew Oberst , Ph.D.

Email: oberst@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 221-7316

Dr. Oberst's research focuses on understanding how different forms of cell death occur, and how they influence immune responses in vivo. Multicellular organisms are complex communities cooperating of cells, and the death of some cells is required for the community to survive and thrive. His work studies the effect of each type of cell death in vivo, with the goal of understanding their role in processes such as inflammation, autoimmunity, tumor suppression, and immune responses to pathogen infection.

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Susan Parkhurst , PhD

Email: susanp@fredhutch.org

The Parkhurst lab is interested in the actions of both maternally and zygotically contributed gene products that govern proper embryonic development in Drosophila. Building tissues and organs during embryogenesis involves a series of exquisite morphogenetic processes including precisely orchestrated tissue contractions, foldings and migrations. Many of the naturally occurring epithelial movements that shape the embryo during morphogenesis are similar to those employed in the wound healing response and to cell behaviors in tumor progression. The Parkhurst lab uses developmental, genetic, cell biological, and molecular approaches to look at different regulatory mechanisms and pathways required for proper Drosophila embryonic development. Their current efforts are divided between studies of: (1) molecular and cellular mechanisms of single cell and multicellular (tissue) wound repair; (2) actin and microtubule cytoskeleton dynamics mediated by the Rho1 small GTPase and its effectors Wash, Capu, and Spire; and (3) nuclear architecture and organization.

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Colin Pritchard , MD, PhD

Email: cpritch@uw.edu

Phone: (206) 598-8400

Dr. Pritchard specializes in cancer molecular diagnostics development for precision medicine and microRNA as blood-based biomarkers and he helped to develop UW-OncoPlex (a molecular test which can inform diagnosis, prognosis, and/or treatment plans for patients). His research is focused on two main areas related to cancer molecular diagnostics: microRNA as blood-based biomarkers, and cancer molecular diagnostics development for precision medicine.

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Martin Prlic , PhD

Email: mprlic@fredhutch.org

Phone: 206-667-2216

The connecting theme throughout Dr. Prlic's research career has been his interest in lymphocyte differentiation. This started initially at the University of Salzburg, Austria, followed by his Ph.D. training at the University of Minnesota in the laboratory of Dr. Stephen Jameson. As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington, he had the opportunity to establish his own T cell and NK cell research projects in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Bevan with a focus on T cell and NK cell responses in the context of infectious diseases. When Dr. Prlic started his own laboratory at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in 2011, he continued his T cell work in the context of vaccination and infectious diseases. Through a close collaboration with Dr. Raphael Gottardo (FHCRC) his lab has started to examine human T cell subsets from blood and mucosal tissues using different single-cell gene expression analysis strategies. Dr. Prlic's overall goal is to understand how T cell fate and function are controlled in healthy and inflamed tissues and following infection with HIV to identify how these responses can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes.

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Ann Roman , PhD

Email: aroman@fredhutch.org

Dr. Roman’s main focus is on the mechanism of HPV pathogenecity, addressing the interplay between the virus and its host cell in undifferentiated and differentiated conditions. She primarily studies this in low-risk HPV, those causing benign disease, to better understand what is needed for replication of all HPVs versus what is unique to the high-risk HPVs, those that contribute to the development of anogenital cancers. She also studies the impact of high-risk HPV gene products on angiogenesis, the recruitment of a blood supply to the cells expressing these viral genes.

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Walter Ruzzo , PhD

Email: ruzzo@cs.washington.edu

Phone: (206) 543-6298

Dr. Ruzzo's research is focused on development of computational methods and tools applicable to practical problems in molecular biology, an increasingly data-rich discipline. Recent work has focused on analysis of high throughput sequencing data, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIPseq) and transcriptomic (RNAseq) data, including development of new methods for mapping, assembly, bias correction, isoform quantitation, and motif discovery. New methods for finding noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes are also being actively developed.

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