James (Jim) Bassingthwaighte MD, PhD



physiology , mathematics/statistics , simulations , PDE/ODE , modeling , imaging , University of Washington

Bio


Dr. Bassingthwaighte's lab uses multiple radioactive tracers simultaneously to measure reactions of adenosine and its metabolites and to determine their rates of transport across membranes. Models describe the kinetics in a precise way, allowing us to understand the regulation. He is also the originator of the Human Physiome Project, a large-scale international program for developing databasing and biological systems modeling for understanding genomic and pharmaceutic effects on human physiology. His program is highly collaborative, involving co-investigators at a dozen U.S. universities, several in Europe, and in 14 departments at the University of Washington. Some of these are involved in the Physiome Project, in particular the Cardiome Project. The Cardiome Project, to define a functional heart in mathematical terms, extends from the biochemistry and the signaling, to the mechanics and energetics of the three-dimensional heart.

Institution


University of Washington Bioengineering Professor